Better Luck Next Time…

door

I’ve just received the predicted email rejection regarding the new job I recently applied for and to be perfectly honest I’m quite relieved. I’d bitten off far more than I could possibly chew by applying for something I was always going to struggle with and I’d actually been quite worried about how I was going to manage. It wasn’t just the work itself but how to juggle all of my other commitments around it; there’s only seven days in a week and I’d need a day off at some point!

For the time being I shall focus on the work that I already have, and although I’ll always be on the lookout for new opportunities, I’ll put a bit more thought into the logistics before applying for another new post. Despite the fact that the panel interview was a terrifying ordeal, I’ve learnt a lot about how I could prepare myself better next time, so at least I can take some positives away from this experience, which will clearly put me in a much better position in the future. Onwards and upwards.

Too Fast…

steps

When you receive an email from your new company offering fast-tracked promotions for a select few; and clearly you’re one of those they wish to promote; it comes as a bit of a shock, especially when you’ve only been working there for a year. To be honest, I had to read the email several times before it sank in, and even then I thought it had to be a clerical error, but apparently not.

My knee-jerk reaction would normally be to take up the offer, and within a week acquire a senior status. However, the reality is that with just twelve months worth of experience I currently feel under-equipped for the role, and I need at least one more year under my belt before I’ll be confident enough to take on such an important job. While the extra cash would be great, of course, and it’s a huge compliment to be asked, sometimes you just need to slow the pace down a little. Although I won’t be attending the required training this time, I haven’t turned down the promotion, I’ve simply put it on hold until I’m ready for the next big step. No matter how tempting, it’s not a particularly good idea to start running before you’ve mastered the art of walking.

 

Musical Bingo…

bingo

No, I’d never heard of it either but nowadays I’m up for most things and as this new experience was part of a Quiz Night in aid of a local wildlife charity I was more than ready for the challenge.

Our venue was one of those quaint village halls; the ones equipped with a stage with red curtains and little wooden steps at the sides; and armed with a vast array of shockingly unhealthy, but delicious, snacks and drinks our team was raring to go. However, despite initial brilliance in Round One, and exceptional observational skills in the Picture Round, we were eventually beaten by several other teams in the quiz section…and then, after the obligatory raffle, came the musical bingo…

Each team were given a sheet full of song titles and artistes and the idea was to listen to snippets of songs being played, crossing off the ones you identify on your own sheet; the winner being the first to get a line, and then a full house. Singing and dancing was enthusiastically¬†encouraged, and there was even a conga line at one point. We’d have been good at Name That Tune, as we instantly recognised the majority of the tracks, but unfortunately were beaten to the finish by another table. However, all was not lost as we managed to come second and were all awarded fabulous choccy Easter eggs – result!

Bombshell…

heart

“You do KNOW you have a heart murmur don’t you?!” were the 10 little words that tumbled out of the doctor’s mouth after rummaging around with his stethoscope down the front of my t-shirt. “Erm…..” ¬†I couldn’t speak. He had another rummage and confirmed “Yes, I can definitely hear one”.

I’d actually booked to see a temporary Gp at my local surgery for a blood pressure review as my usual one was away. The nurse who’d seen me a few days earlier confirmed that my blood pressure remains sky high and therefore the new medications weren’t working; to be frankly honest, this new information wasn’t exactly helpful in that department! (Although I guess it might explain the high readings along with an apparently high pulse rate).

Quite how this malfunction hadn’t been spotted during the numerous medical examinations I’d had in the past I have no idea, but hopefully all will become clearer once I’ve seen the heart specialist for my echo-cardiogram. I’m now trying NOT to focus on the fact that my father died from heart problems, and am choosing to be thankful that it’s been spotted (better late than never) and I’m excited about a whole new experience, rather than terrified of the implications. At least life’s never dull in my world!